Group of people sat in a sofa

Why humans aren’t redundant yet

It has been widely established that AI and Automation will transform the workplace and our economy. However, it will not only enhance a businesses technological processes but the people within it too.

Machines and algorithms are expected to create 133 million new roles but will replace 75 million positions by 2022, according to the World Economic Forum. But the question is, what type of roles is it creating and displacing? And what skills will these roles need?

Human connection can’t be automated

A few weeks ago CIPD released the ‘People and machines: from hype to reality’ report. It revealed that professional and higher technical staff are one of the most likely fields to be affected by AI and automation at 28%. In contrast, sales and service occupations are the least likely to be impacted at 5%. Although machines are more proficient in processing and understanding large amounts of data, they can’t replace human connection. For example, in sales positions, it takes that human connection to build a rapport with a customer and problem-solve any complaints or issues they are having. The ability to communicate, problem-solve, manage your time and stay motivated – widely known as soft skills.

Interestingly this shift is also reflected in the job market. According to Harvard University, the need for STEM-related roles greatly increased between 1989 and 2000 on the global jobs market but hasn’t significantly grown since. But positions in the creative industries, a sector which is rich in soft skills, increased in demand by 20% between 2011 and 2016. These statistics reveal a future where the need for soft skills in the workforce will become increasingly important.

What are the most valued soft skills?

At the beginning of the year, LinkedIn uncovered the skills companies will need most in 2019, and at the top of that list was creativity. We are about the enter the fourth industrial revolution, companies will need creatives to lead them into the future to create new ideas and methods of working alongside new technology such as AI.

The World Economic Forum also found that 90% of top performers at work also have high emotional intelligence. According to Psychologist Daniel Goleman, emotional intelligence is defined by five core components:

  • Self-awareness – an understanding of your own emotions and how they could affect others.
  • Self-regulation – this is the ability to think before you react to a situation and the degree you are able to control your moods and impulses.
  • Internal motivation – rather than pursuing a goal for a reward, you are motivated to achieve for personal reasons, for instance, personal development.
  • Empathy – you are able to recognise and understand other people’s motivations.
  • Social skills – you can build a network and manage relationships.

This skill is essential for successfully managing a team, communicating with colleagues or customers. The CIPD report at the beginning of this article showed that the least affected roles will be people focused. This ability will be key for employees who want to successfully conduct themselves in the workplace.

How can businesses measure emotional intelligence and creativity in their applicants?

Cognisess Pro can measure a variety of soft skills through our scientifically backed assessments, including emotional intelligence and creativity. Allowing companies to hire a future-ready workforce.

We achieve this using the Cognisess’ Baseline Assessments along with our Team Fit tool. Creativity is measured by:

  • A person’s openness to experience. If an applicant isn’t willing to try new things, they are unlikely to think outside the box

  • Conscientiousness. For a person to be highly creative this needs to be an average score. An individual needs to commit to a plan, but not so rigidly that they don’t attempt a different method that could work better.   

  • Risk taking. This also needs to be an average or just above average score. They need to be confident enough to take a calculated risk in order to pursue an innovative idea, but simultaneously not constantly take risks.

As a result of this, companies are able to create teams which have a strong representation in terms of both creative skills and aptitudes – but also ensuring the team composition has a high level of Psychological Safety. Psychological Safety is directly related to someone’s emotional intelligence and can be identified as a part of our Team Fit tool. Our expert analytics team have identified that team members who have higher emotional intelligence tend to also have a higher level of Psychological Safety. This means they feel more comfortable speaking their mind in potentially difficult or stressful situations. When considering this in terms of innovation and creativity, it becomes a vital skill for a person to have. As there is nothing gained for the company from someone who is extremely creative at work, yet lacks the confidence to share their ideas with the rest of their team.

How to stay relevant in a fast-changing world

From work carried out with a variety of companies over the past 2 years, Cognisess has identified that understanding the creative composition of a team is a very important factor for companies looking to be innovative.  

Many current thinking and methods will quickly become outdated and irrelevant to a fast-changing and increasingly automated world. Creativity and problem-solving are hugely important for keeping the focus and energy of an organisation moving forward helping to innovate their processes and systems through the coming transformational years  Without this ability to be more fluidly creative and adaptable, organisations will be held back or simply may become redundant in the market. Cognisess has recognised that being able to accurately identify and recruit the talent who can bring creativity and innovation, ill enable Talent Managers within HR to make better decisions about the people and teams who should be empowered as the trendsetters versus those are more likely to conform to or defend the outdated modes of thinking.

Creativity – in the right team environment – is becoming essential to future proof organisations. It elevates the organisation’s strength in producing ideas and innovation through the free trade of ideas and accelerate the uptake of innovation throughout the organisation and help to cultivate a positive culture of freely shared ideas and possibilities. Companies can then reap the rewards of a future-oriented culture that is constantly and confidently implementing new ways to improve the contribution and progression of the business for employees, management, customers and shareholders alike.

Become future ready and recruit the soft skills every company will need in the age of automation. If you would like to learn more about assessing creativity, emotional intelligence or our Team Fit tool, book a demo with our expert team.

We’re all human, so we can’t help our unconscious bias but AI can help reduce it in the recruitment process

Humans unconsciously process 11 million pieces of information per second. In order to manage this mass of data, our brains have had to adapt by creating ‘shortcuts’ to help us make decisions. Without this, we would be paralysed into making no decisions or just random ones. But this approach adopted by our brain can lead to patterns of illogical thinking – this is called cognitive bias.  

It is thought there are at least 175 types of biases, this diagram allows you to explore all of them. But to keep things simple, we’ve grouped the biases into four types of typical hurdles the brain encounters every day:

  • Too much information – Our brain uses a few ‘shortcuts’ to condense information. A key aspect of this is humans are drawn to details that support their existing beliefs. An example of this was uncovered in a research paper by Harvard Business School. They discovered employers aren’t prejudiced against women because of their gender, but because they have the perception that men perform better in certain tasks.
  • Lack of information – In contrast, when there isn’t enough information our brain fills in the gaps. This includes filling in characteristics of a person or a group from prior history or stereotypes. We also assume people we are familiar with are better than people we don’t know.
  • The need to act fast – When we need to make a decision quickly we tend to choose the option that is the least risky to avoid mistakes and preserve our status in a group.   
  • What should we remember? In a world packed with information, our brains need to decide which elements will prove useful in the future. Our minds have created a few methods to enhance storage space, for example, the brain prefers generalisations over specifics because they take up less space.

How can bias affect the recruitment process?

Unfortunately, we can’t eliminate these biases and they can sometimes seep into the recruitment process. In a recent study, researchers sent a number of CVs to businesses. These applicants had similar levels of experience, the only aspect which differed were their names – the applicants either had stereotypical black, Latino or white names. They also asked a group of people to physically hand in their CV at a number of companies, again, they each shared similar qualifications but were different ethnicities. The researchers found that white applicants received 36% more callbacks than African Americans and 24% more than Latinos. The study also uncovered that racism in hiring hasn’t changed since 1989. Although we all want to ensure a recruitment process is as fair as possible and we may not intentionally be applying bias, our brain is automatically applying these bias ‘shortcuts’ to make decisions quickly.

Being unconsciously biased is an inherent part of being human – even if we try to avoid it or correct ourselves. So, once we realise we can be prone to unconscious bias despite our best efforts, we should be turning to AI as a helpful tool to help keep us compliant and open up the recruitment process.

How can AI transform the recruitment process?

Our Chief Scientific Officer, Dr Boris Altemeyer, revealed to Information Age that “AI doesn’t have to understand its own unconscious bias, because it has none. AI does not need diversity and inclusion training. It’s incapable of taking an instant dislike to someone, secretly wondering whether someone’s planning on starting a family, or hiring someone who’s pleasingly similar to them.

As AI isn’t human it has the capacity to be completely objective. This can be used as a tool to help HR create a fairer recruitment process. For instance, Cognisess Pro, our market-leading recruitment platform driven by AI, makes it optional for candidates to disclose age, gender, race or the schools they went to and can also hide this information from assessors too. More significantly, this personal information is never taken into account for Cognisess assessments – our system is mostly interested in assessing how your brain works. This way recruiters can focus purely on what matters when hiring an applicant. This is called blind recruitment and it provides decision makers with an in-depth understanding of a candidate’s suitability for the role, regardless of background, age, gender or ethnicity to create an environment for recruiters to make objective and well-informed decisions about a candidates potential.

The Cognisess platform is data-driven with over 50 assessments to choose from and measures over 120 human attributes. The insights created from this data has been proven to assist companies like AB InBev, CIL and IHG  make better informed and fewer bias decisions about recruitment and assessments. For example, hotel giant IHG has recently ensured a gender equality of 93.75% through their recruitment process using Cognisess Pro, enabling a fairer and more accurate approach to talent management compared to their more traditional recruitment processes.

Attract more talent, increase your diversity

There are many benefits of using an AI recruiting platform like Cognisess Pro. Using this software provides an opportunity to increase diversity in a company’s workforce. A more diverse team can equate to a more profitable company, a McKinsey report uncovered that “Companies in the top quartile for racial and ethnic diversity are 35 per cent more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians.” It can also attract more talent to apply for a company with 67% of applicants wanting to join a diverse team.

As our brains have over 175 individual biases, it can be hard to be sure we are making a totally objective hiring decision. It makes sense to use AI as a tool to facilitate a fairer and more efficient process to help us accurately hire the best person for the role – every time. It is incorporating the best of both worlds, a recruiter’s years of experience with AI’s objective stance. Adopting AI in HR has never been easier. Our team of People Analytics experts can guide you through the first steps of adding AI to your HR processes. If you would like to find out more please get in contract or book a FREE demo of Cognisess Pro, the most advanced People Analytics and AI Assessment Platform on the market today.

Why Amazon’s Ml / AI CV Selection Tool Developed a Bias

Our Chief Scientific Officer, Dr Boris Altemeyer, comments on why Amazon’s AI recruitment tool developed a sexist bias.

It is very interesting to see that a tech giant with, arguably, access to the absolute best talent in this area has admitted defeat. Their AI was simply automating bias, rather than removing it.

Based on our experience, it is not entirely surprising that this occurred. Relying on CV information for job fit is a limited, risky and biased approach. It is affected by factors such as language proficiency, the locus of control (how much you attribute things happening to you as being a result of your own actions), as well as education and social economic status.

Many high profile individuals rely on professional writers to fine-tune or completely ghostwrite their CVs. Therefore using mere a CV as an indicator of potential job performance relies on one – questionable – assumption: what you did in the past and are able to document coherently is indicative of what you are likely to do in a complex and changing environment.

It has been shown in research – meta-studies in particular – that CVs are not a reliable indicator of performance. Therefore, Cognisess starts at the point of which decisions are made: the brain.

The Cognisess Deep Learn framework that underlies many of our features doesn’t take the same approach as an AI CV selection tool. We are interested in learning as much as possible about a person to make a considered decision, whilst assessing their individual potential. However, personal information such as CV data is only a fraction (and actually the least part) that we are interested in.

Objective metrics such as the ability to inhibit automatic responses, paradigm-shifting, or problem solving, are not impacted by your ability to express how good you are at them. Which is why Cognisess use accessible game mechanics to measure them.

Whilst one can argue that there are gender differences between certain aspects of brain preference and function, this is far less of a concern in our complex profilers. If one were to select an employee purely based on one attribute, it wouldn’t paint a full picture of a candidate. However, when we build profilers with up to 140 separate aspects, each of which can have individual weights, target values, and thresholds, these effects arguably become insignificant.

The wealth of data that can be generated on cognition, emotion, behaviour and emotion detection in videos via AI, allows employers to take the crucial step to calibrate what ‘best’ truly looks like. In many cases, the Amazon AI recruiting tool will lead to additional scrutiny on what has caused the bias in workforce diversity including the poorly established or biased KPIs.

Contact us to schedule a demo and a two-week free trial of Cognisess Pro – the most advanced People Analytics and Assessments Platform in the market today.